Costs of hearing-related health claims on the rise in Canadian military

Costs of hearing-related health claims on the rise in Canadian military

Richard Blanchette, a retired major-general who suffered hearing loss during his years of service, said the Department of National Defence does everything in its power to protect members and it’s the responsibility of the members to do their part.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/military-hearing-loss-members-reluctant-to-wear-protection-1.4711517

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At this Ontario farm, Canadian veterans are taking control over their own healing

At this Ontario farm, Canadian veterans are taking control over their own healing
‘Broken’ after his discharge from the army, ex-paratrooper Eric Coupal founded the Quartz Ridge Sanctuary, near Sudbury, to help his fellow vets
https://tvo.org/article/current-affairs/at-this-ontario-farm-canadian-veterans-are-taking-control-over-their-own-healing

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Lt (ret) Wolf Solkin on the Transfer of Ste Anne to the Prov of Quebec

Lt (ret) Wolf Solkin on the Transfer of Ste Anne to the Prov of Quebec

April 3rd Lt (ret) Solkin received his Quilt of Valor.

Please listen to Lt Solkin explain how Ste Anne is going down hill from its transfer to the provincial (Quebec)

Lt Solkin is an advocate for residents of Ste Anne for many years now. Please share and listen very carefully. Encourage Wolf in his advocacy by emailing him [email protected]

Click on the link: http://canadianveteransadvocacy.com/Board2/index.php?board=198

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Disability Tax Credit Supplementary Form

Disability Tax Credit Supplementary Form

http://canadianveteransadvocacy.com/VACDND_Services-Benefits/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Disability-Tax-Credit-Supplement-Info_REDACTED-ORIGINAL-WEB-Rev-1.2.pdf

[pdf-embedder url=”http://canadianveteransadvocacy.com/VACDND_Services-Benefits/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Disability-Tax-Credit-Supplement-Info_REDACTED-ORIGINAL-WEB-Rev-1.2.pdf” title=”Disability Tax Credit Supplement Info_REDACTED ORIGINAL WEB Rev 1.2″]

CRA DTC https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/tax/individuals/segments/tax-credits-deductions-persons-disabilities/disability-tax-credit.html?utm_campaign=not-applicable&utm_medium=vanity-url&utm_source=canada-ca_disability-tax-credit

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FULL/HIDDEN REPORT: Review Progress on Transition from Military to Civilian Life

FULL/HIDDEN REPORT: Review Progress on Transition from Military to Civilian Life / Transforming Veterans Affairs Canada

A hidden report from VAC.

Hitachi Consulting believes that VAC and others have conducted sufficient studies and analyses in recent months and years in order to take action now to make significant improvement in transition success.

Click here to view the report: http://canadianveteransadvocacy.com/VACDND_Services-Benefits/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/Review-Progress-on-Transitions-from-Military-to-Civilian-Life-Rev-1.0.pdf

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Obligation of physician to fill out 3rd party forms / Obligation du médecin de remplir des formulaires de tiers parite

Obligation of physician to fill out 3rd party forms / Obligation du médecin de remplir des formulaires de tiers parite

In the up coming weeks CVA, will contact all College of Physicians Canada wide to verify the obligation of physician in filling out 3rd party forms. We know that in Ontario they must.

Au cours des prochaines semaines, CVA communiquera avec l’ensemble des Collège des médecins du Canada afin de vérifier l’obligation du médecin de remplir les formulaires de tierces parties. Nous savons qu’en Ontario, ils doivent.

ONTARIO

Please use the following link to review the College’s policy on Third Party Reports: http://www.cpso.on.ca/policies/policies/default.aspx?ID=1658
There is a specific section in this policy which discusses the College’s expectations regarding a physician’s obligation to complete a third party report. The policy states that “The obligation to provide a report will depend on whether the physician has a treating relationship with the subject of the report. Treating physicians are obligated to provide reports about their own patients when proper consent is provided.”
Should you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to contact me at the telephone number listed below.
Sincerely,
Jill Weroski
Advisor, Advisory Services Department
College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario
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Military Family Services is conducting a survey to determine the needs of parents of Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) members

English

Military Family Services is conducting a survey to determine the needs of parents of Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) members and their spouses, and the needs of CAF members and their spouses who care for parents, and we would like to invite you to participate.  Your input will help us to serve you better now and into the future.  The results of the survey will assist us in better meeting your needs and providing the services you value. We value your opinion and thank you in advance for your participation.

Director General Military Personnel Research and Analysis authorizes the administration of this survey within Department of National Defence / Canadian Armed Forces in accordance with Defence Administrative Order and Directives (DAOD) 5062-0 and 5062-1. The SSRRB Coordination and Authorization number is 1722/17-F.

Your participation is completely voluntary and you have a choice to end your participation without consequence at any time.  Participation involves completing this online web-based survey, which should take approximately 30 minutes to complete.  You can expect a range of questions covering a variety of topics such as basic demographics, stressors facing parents of CAF members, supports to families of military personnel, etc. A list of Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) support service contact numbers can be accessed online by clicking this link here that you may use at any point if you feel any stress or discomfort as a result of these questions.

You do not have to answer any questions that you do not wish to. The information you provide will be summarized, in anonymous format, in the body of the final report. At no time will any specific responses be attributed to you. All source documentation will be kept strictly confidential.

If you would like to participate, please use the link below to open the survey.

https://cfmws.checkbox.ca/Parents-of-CAF-Needs-Assessment-2018.aspx

Should you have any comments or questions regarding this survey, please feel free to contact Lynda Manser, Senior Manager Strategic Program Development, Military Family Services; Deputy Director, Comprehensive Military Family Plan ([email protected]).

 

 

French

Les Services aux familles des militaires (SFM) effectuent ce sondage pour déterminer les besoins des parents des membres des Forces armées canadiennes (FAC), et les besoins des membres et leurs conjoints que s’occupent des parents. Vos commentaires nous aideront à mieux vous servir, maintenant et à l’avenir. Votre opinion nous est précieuse, et nous vous remercions à l’avance de votre participation.

Votre participation est tout à fait volontaire et vous pouvez y mettre fin à tout moment, sans conséquence. Pour participer, vous devez remplir ce sondage en ligne, ce qui vous prendra environ 30 minutes.

Vous pouvez vous attendre à différents types de questions, notamment des questions à choix multiple, des questions par oui ou non, des questions utilisant une échelle de notation et des questions à réponse courte. Les sujets abordés peuvent toucher notamment vos caractéristiques sociodémographiques, les facteurs de stress qui touchent les parents des membres des FAC et les autres ressources de soutien que votre famille utilise. Une liste de numéros de téléphone de personnes-ressources des FAC est accessible en ligne. Vous pouvez vous y référer en tout temps pour obtenir un soutien si des questions vous causent du stress ou un malaise.

Vous ne serez pas tenu de répondre à une question qui pourrait vous occasionner de l’inconfort. Vous pouvez vous retirer de l’étude en tout temps sans pénalité – la participation est entièrement volontaire.

Si vous souhaitez participer, veuillez utiliser le lien ci-dessous pour ouvrir le sondage.

https://cfmws.checkbox.ca/Parents-of-CAF-Needs-Assessment-2018.aspx

Si vous avez des commentaires ou des questions à formuler au sujet du sondage, n’hésitez pas à communiquer avec : Lynda Manser, Gestionnaire principale, Élaboration des programmes stratégiques, Services aux familles des militaires, Directrice adjointe, Plan global pour les familles des militaires, [email protected].

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CVA Live FaceBook: VAc Assistance Services, CAF Medical Release Exam and VIP

Canadian Veteran Advocacy FaceBook Live Episode No. 3

WED JAN 24th 21:00 EST (max 30 min)
**VETERANS INDEPENDANCE PROGRAM **
[1] Introduction
[2] Subject of the Day: VETERAN INDEPENDENCE PROGRAM
a. http://www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/services/health/veterans-independence-program
b. Assessments http://www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/about-us/policy/document/877
Main area of advocacy: 1. CAF Medical Release Exam 2. ResF, 3. VIP assessments and reassessments
Never a 100% guarantee in success when we intervene and service depends greatly on level of health.
Social Media
Main Web Page | Notre page internet http://www.canadianveteransadvocacy.com/index.html
FaceBook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/CdnVetsAdvocacy/
FaceBook Page: https://www.facebook.com/CanadianVeteransAdvocacy
FaceBook Page FRANCHOPHONE: Groupe de défense des intérêts des anciens combattants canadiens
Information Repository | Repertoire d’information http://canadianveteransadvocacy.com/Board2/index.php
Veterans Affairs Canada, CAF Services and Benefits | Services et avantages des FAC et anciens combattant Canada http://canadianveteransadvocacy.com/VACDND_Services-Benefits
We, the veterans, are here to support the soldiers of today and the veterans of tomorrow. Everything we do now, or don’t do will affect these young men and women when they eventually do remove the uniform. Their well-being is paramount. This is the duty of the veteran.
Cell: 438-829-8133 text only
—————————-
Canadian Veteran Advocacy FaceBook Live Episode No. 2
WED JAN 17th 21:00 EST (max 30 min) CAF Medical Release Exam
[1] Introduction
[2] Social Media
[3] My Advocacy with CAF, VAC and SISIP
[4] VAC 10 Commandments & Useful links
a. Drug Formulary http://ow.ly/q9T330hCZvp
b. Benefits and Services – (POC) http://ow.ly/ziEX30hCZyL
c. Benefit Grid http://ow.ly/XEyu30hCZBm
d. Policies http://ow.ly/MTic30hCZCQ
e. Fact and Figures http://ow.ly/anK130hCZFg
[5] Brief overview of subjects
a. Recording conversations with VAC & CAF https://legaltree.ca/node/908
b. VIP Denial
c. VAC Assistance Services
d. Role of CM
e. Medication
f. PTSD and consequential conditions
g. Conditions that give you dental
[6] Subject of the Day: CAF Medical Release Exam
Main area of advocacy: 1. CAF Medical Release Exam 2. ResF, 3. VIP assessments and reassessments
Never a 100% guarantee in success when we intervene and service depends greatly on level of health.
Social Media
Main Web Page | Notre page internet http://www.canadianveteransadvocacy.com/index.html
FaceBook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/CdnVetsAdvocacy/
FaceBook Page: https://www.facebook.com/CanadianVeteransAdvocacy
FaceBook Page FRANCHOPHONE: Groupe de défense des intérêts des anciens combattants canadiens
Information Repository | Repertoire d’information http://canadianveteransadvocacy.com/Board2/index.php
Veterans Affairs Canada, CAF Services and Benefits | Services et avantages des FAC et anciens combattant Canada http://canadianveteransadvocacy.com/VACDND_Services-Benefits
We, the veterans, are here to support the soldiers of today and the veterans of tomorrow. Everything we do now, or don’t do will affect these young men and women when they eventually do remove the uniform. Their well-being is paramount. This is the duty of the veteran.
Cell: 438-829-8133 text only
———————————————

Canadian Veteran Advocacy FaceBook Live Episode No. 1
JAN 5th 14:15 EST (max 30 min) *VAC Assistance Services*
[1] Introduction
[2] Social Media
[3] My Advocacy with CAF, VAC and SISIP
[4] Brief overview of subjects
a. Recording conversations with VAC
b. VIP Denial
c. CAF Medical Release Exam
d. Role of CM
e. Medication
f. PTSD and consequential conditions
g. Conditions that give you dental
[5] Subject of the Day: VAC Assistance Services
Main area of advocacy:
1. CAF Medical Release Exam
2. ResF
3. VIP assessments and reassessments
Never a 100% guarantee in success when we intervene and service depends greatly on level of health.
Social Media
Main Web Page | Notre page internet http://www.canadianveteransadvocacy.com/index.html
FaceBook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/CdnVetsAdvocacy/
FaceBook Page: https://www.facebook.com/CanadianVeteransAdvocacy
FaceBook Page FRANCHOPHONE: Groupe de défense des intérêts des anciens combattants canadiens
Information Repository | Repertoire d’information http://canadianveteransadvocacy.com/Board2/index.php
Veterans Affairs Canada, CAF Services and Benefits | Services et avantages des FAC et anciens combattant Canada http://canadianveteransadvocacy.com/VACDND_Services-Benefits
Cell: 438-829-8133 text only
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Review Progress on Transition from Military to Civilian Life (HIDDEN REPORT)

Review Progress on Transition from Military to Civilian Life (HIDDEN REPORT)
Transforming Veterans Affairs Canada
Hitachi Consulting believes that VAC and others have conducted sufficient studies and analyses in recent months and years in order to take action now to make significant improvement in transition success.
A hidden report from VAC. Both past and current VAC Minister’s did not release this report.

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Life After Service Survey 2016 – Sondage sur la vie après le service militaire 2016 Sommaire

Life After Service Survey 2016 – Sondage sur la vie après le service militaire 2016 Sommaire

REPORT: http://www.canadianveteransadvocacy.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/LASS-2016-survey-TR2.pdf

The Life After Service Studies (LASS) program of research is designed to further understand the transition from military to civilian life and ultimately improve the health of Veterans in Canada. LASS partners are Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC), the Department of National Defence/Canadian Armed Forces (DND/CAF), and Statistics Canada. LASS 2016 expands on the earlier studies from 2010 and 2013 by including family content and a longitudinal component in two major studies: the survey of health and well-being, and the record linkage for pre- and post-release income trends. This technical report provides initial cross-sectional findings for Regular Force Veterans from the 2016 survey. Additional analysis will be covered in subsequent reports.

LASS 2016 survey data was collected by telephone in February and March 2016 by Statistics Canada interviewers who obtained a 73% response rate. Results describe Veterans who released (at post-entry ranks) from the CAF Regular Force between 1998 and 2015.

Findings indicate that 52% of Veterans reported an easy adjustment to civilian life, while 32% reported difficulty. Officers had a lower rate of difficult adjustment (17%), compared to 29% of Senior Non-Commissioned Members (SrNCM) and 39% of Junior Non-Commissioned Members (JrNCM). Veterans with recent releases (between 2012 and 2015) had a higher rate of difficult adjustment (42%), compared to earlier releases between 1998 and 2012 (29%). Compared to those with earlier releases, these recently-released Veterans had higher rates of service in Afghanistan, fair or poor self-rated mental health and less than 10 years of military service, all factors associated with difficult adjustment.

Veterans reported chronic conditions, including arthritis (29%), depression (21%), anxiety (15%), and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (14%), at higher prevalences than Canadians of comparable age and sex. SrNCM had the highest rate of arthritis (40%), and JrNCM had the highest rates of depression (24%), anxiety (18%), and PTSD (18%). Veterans also reported higher rates than Canadians for hearing problems, pain, and activity limitations. Since LASS 2013, the trend for chronic conditions has been increasing, although not statistically significant.

Most Veterans were employed (65%). SrNCM had a lower employment rate (57%) compared to Officers (64%), and JrNCM (70%). The unemployment rate for Veterans was 8%, similar to Canadians of comparable age and sex. Non-labour force activities for Veterans included retirement (16%), on disability (8%), and training (5%). Since LASS 2013, the trend for non-labour force activities has been increasing, although not statistically significant.

Some Veterans experienced low income (4%). This was lower than Canadians of comparable age and sex (14%), and has not changed since LASS 2013. JrNCM had the highest rate (6%). Most Veterans were satisfied with their finances (69%), and has decreased since LASS 2013 (74%). Officers had a higher satisfaction rate (85%) compared to SrNCM (75%), and JrNCM (60%).

LASS 2016 included new content on families. When asked about the effect their release had on the family, most Veterans reported that the transition was easy for their partner (57%) and their children (60%). However, 28% of Veterans indicated their partners had difficulty with their release, and 17% reported their children had difficulty with their release.

LASS findings have provided evidence to inform the efforts of both VAC and DND/CAF to support transition to civilian life. LASS 2016 findings will continue to contribute to improvements to programs, benefits, communications and outreach, to ultimately improve the health and well-being of Veterans in Canada.

Sondage sur la vie après le service militaire 2016
Sommaire

Le programme de recherche Études sur la vie après le service militaire (EVASM) vise à nous aider à mieux comprendre la transition de la vie militaire à la vie civile et en bout de ligne à améliorer la santé des vétérans au Canada. Les partenaires des EVASM sont Anciens Combattants Canada (ACC), le ministère de la Défense nationale/les Forces armées canadiennes (MDN/FAC) et Statistique Canada. Les EVASM 2016 élargissent les études antérieures réalisées en 2010 et 2013 en incluant la dimension familiale et une composante longitudinale dans deux études importantes : l’enquête sur la santé et le bien-être et le couplage de données sur les tendances en matière de revenu avant et après la libération. Ce rapport technique fournit les premières constatations transversales de l’enquête de 2016 pour les vétérans de la Force régulière. Une analyse supplémentaire sera traitée dans des rapports subséquents.

Les données de l’enquête dans le cadre des EVASM 2016 ont été recueillies par téléphone en février et en mars 2016 par des intervieweurs de Statistique Canada qui ont obtenu un taux de réponse de 73 %. Les résultats décrivent les vétérans qui ont été libérés (à des grades postérieurs à l’entrée) de la Force régulière des FAC entre 1998 et 2015.

Les constatations indiquent que 52 % des vétérans ont déclaré que leur transition à la vie civile avait été facile, alors que cette transition a été difficile pour 32 % d’entre eux. Les officiers affichaient un plus faible taux de difficulté d’adaptation (17 %), comparativement aux militaires de rang supérieur (MR sup) (29 %) et aux militaires de rang subalterne (MR sub) (39 %). Les vétérans récemment libérés (entre 2012 et 2015) ont affiché un taux plus élevé de difficulté d’adaptation (42 %), comparativement aux vétérans libérés entre 1998 et 2012 (29 %). Comparativement aux vétérans libérés plus tôt, les vétérans récemment libérés affichaient un taux plus élevé de service en Afghanistan, une auto-évaluation de la santé mentale passable ou mauvaise, et moins de 10 années de service militaire, soit tous des facteurs associés à une adaptation difficile.

Les vétérans ont déclaré souffrir d’affections chroniques, comme l’arthrite (29 %), la dépression (21 %), l’anxiété (15 %) et l’état de stress post-traumatique (ESPT) (14 %), à un taux de prévalence plus élevé que dans la population canadienne de même âge et sexe. Le taux d’arthrite était le plus élevé chez les MR sup (40 %), alors que les MR sub affichaient les taux les plus élevés de dépression (24 %), d’anxiété (18 %) et d’ESPT (18 %). Les taux de problèmes d’audition, de douleur et d’incapacités fonctionnelles étaient plus élevés chez les vétérans que chez les Canadiens. Depuis les EVASM 2013, la tendance pour les affections chroniques a augmenté, mais pas statistiquement significative.

La plupart des vétérans occupaient un emploi (65 %). Le taux d’emploi des MR sup (57 %) était inférieur à celui des officiers (64 %) et des MR sub (70 %). Le taux de chômage chez les vétérans était de 8 %, semblable à celui de la population canadienne de même âge et sexe. Les activités autres que main d’œuvre pour les vétérans comprenaient la retraite (16 %), l’état d’invalidité (8 %) et la formation (5 %). Depuis les EVASM 2013, la tendance pour les activités autres que main d’œuvre a augmenté, mais pas statistiquement significative.

Certains vétérans avaient un faible revenu (4 %). Le taux était inférieur à celui de la population canadienne de même âge et sexe (14 %), et il est inchangé depuis les EVASM 2013. Les MR sub affichaient le taux le plus élevé (6 %). La plupart des vétérans étaient satisfaits de leur situation financière (69 %). Les officiers affichaient le plus haut taux de satisfaction (85 %) comparativement aux MR sup (75 %) et aux MR sub (60 %) et a diminué depuis les EVASM 2013 (74 %).

Les EVASM 2016 comprenaient une nouvelle dimension sur les familles. Lorsqu’on a demandé aux vétérans quelle avait été l’incidence de leur libération sur leur famille, la plupart d’entre eux ont indiqué que la transition avait été facile pour leur partenaire (57 %) et leurs enfants (60 %). Toutefois, 28 % des vétérans ont indiqué que leurs partenaires avaient de la difficulté avec leur libération, et 17 % ont indiqué que leurs enfants avaient eu de la difficulté avec leur libération.

Les résultats des EVASM ont permis de fournir des éléments de preuve pour documenter les efforts d’ACC et du MDN/FAC et appuyer ainsi la transition vers la vie civile. Les résultats des EVASM 2016 continueront de contribuer à l’amélioration des programmes, des avantages, des communications et de la sensibilisation, pour améliorer en bout de ligne la santé et le bien-être des vétérans au Canada.

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